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GREEN ISLAND - IMO 7390703

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Photo Details
Photographer:frtrfred [View profile]Title:GREEN ISLANDAdded:Aug 21, 2011
Captured:IMO:7390703Hits:1,936
Location:New Orleans, United States
Photo Category: Barge Carriers
Description:
Another Watterman Lines barge carrier built in 1974 Photo taken on a hot rainy day in Sept 2000 in New Orleans
Later scrapped in 2002
Vessel Identification
Name:Green Island
IMO:7390703
Technical Data
Vessel type:Naval/naval Auxiliary Vessel
Gross tonnage:28,487 tons
Summer DWT:47,036 tons

Additional Information
Status:Dead
Build year:1975
AIS Information
AIS information: N/A
More Of This Ship
GREEN ISLAND
© Pilot Frans
More Of: This Photographer - This Ship - This Ship By This Photographer

Photo Comments (3)

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Captain Ted on Dec 03, 2012 17:09 (5 years ago)
REG
that,s correct,,and failed grandiose !!!, I was on small vessels where food was for a month supplied ready packed and NOBODY ever wanted to sign back on,,until they discontiniued it. Reminds me of the 12 men crews on big vessels in the 80,s where whole generators where exchanged through holes cut into the hulls ,because it was innovative and cheap, until they found out that overhauling a aux engine and such aboard was much cheaper than doing it ashore, not to mention the cost of removing and bring back. I do not know any shippingline which owns ships does that still on that scale. Shore support is huge on certain ships, special when big boxers are sailed with crews of 12 or 14 men. But in the end overhaul and repair aboard is cheaper, better that,s another story
REG on Dec 03, 2012 17:00 (5 years ago)
The enormous gantry crane, which loaded cargo barges on and off the ship, could lift 480 tons. The pair of booms on foredeck were used only for loading ship's stores, which were lowered into the ship through a hatch in the foredeck.

In the original LASH ship concept, at the end of each voyage fresh stores were supposed to arrive alongside already packed into small refrigerated containers, which would be lowered into position inside the ship through the foredeck, secured in position and then plugged into the ship's electrical power. The idea was that the whole operation would be as quick and easy as possible. It was a very innovative concept in the early 1970s, and it still is!
REG on Jun 17, 2012 12:29 (6 years ago)
She was built originally for Central Gulf Lines, sister-ship of Green Harbour and Green Valley. She was later transferred for operation by Waterman (the two lines were actually owned by the same firm). Although she was re-painted in Waterman's company colors, as seen here, she retained her original name (Central Gulf ships were always called "Green-something").
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