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Marie Maersk - IMO 9619933

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Photo Details
Photographer:lappino [View profile]Title:Marie MaerskAdded:May 28, 2013
Captured:May 27, 2013IMO:9619933Hits:3,010
Location:Okpo, Korea (South)
Photo Category: Ships Under Construction
Description:
Outfitting at DSME shipyard on Geoje Island.
Vessel Identification
Name:Marie Maersk
IMO:9619933
Flag:Denmark International Register
MMSI:219018765
Callsign:OWJF2
Technical Data
Vessel type:Container Ship
Gross tonnage:194,849 tons
Summer DWT:194,327 tons

Additional Information
Home port:Dragor
Class society:American Bureau Of Shipping
Build year:2013
Builder (*):Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering
Geoje, South Korea
Owner:Ap Moller Maersk
Copenhagen, Denmark
Manager:Ap Moller Maersk
Copenhagen, Denmark
AIS Information
Last known position:
1°11’24.97” N, 103°38’6” E
Status:Underway
Speed, course (heading):
17.6kts, 291° (289°)
Destination:
Location:Tanjung Pelepas
Arrival:26th Jul 2014
15:00:30 UTC
Last update:
3 days 9 hours ago
Source:AIS (AirNav ShipTrax)

Port history
2014 July 26th, 15:00:30 UTCTanjung Pelepas
2014 July 22nd, 22:00:38 UTCYantian
2014 July 19th, 07:45:42 UTCYangshan
2014 July 19th, 07:30:29 UTCShanghai
2014 July 18th, 02:15:45 UTCNingbo
2014 June 20th, 16:00:45 UTCSuez
2014 June 13th, 01:00:14 UTCTangier Med
2014 June 7th, 19:00:37 UTCRotterdam
2014 June 5th, 18:00:15 UTCBremerhaven
2014 June 3rd, 03:30:31 UTCGothenburg
More Of This Ship
Marie Maersk
© Pilot Frans
Marie Maersk
© Pilot Frans
Marie Maersk
© Pilot Frans
More Of: This Photographer - This Ship - This Ship By This Photographer

Photo Comments (10)

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Andrew McAlpine on May 29, 2013 22:30 (1 year ago)
Super photo as always, the article on gcaptain is indeed intereseting but having been lucky enough to visit DSME 2 weeks ago during the construction and with John from gcaptain who wrote the article can confirm that welding is done with a machine and by hand for the more complicated sections.
Re the top speed having looked at the log on marinetraffic i can only find a top speed of 24.4 knots that was recorded at 2013-05-29 10:06?
Also re the excess tonnage of the industry I do believe the lines have their part to play in the problems by ordering extra large tonnage, but during the ordering boom no one could forsee the economic problems that the world would face and lines were at that point paying catch up to ever growing cargo volumes.
Now lines need to save money an the only way is by economies of scale and having less larger ships is the one way thay can do this, the gamble is will the europe-far east trades ever recover? with manufacturing being moved away from China will emerging markets grow and require larger tonnage as we are already seeing on the South American trades. It is likely that the triple-e will be a game changer and that is why other lines have and are considering ordering simular vessels, CSCL & UASC, as it is likley only lines with this size vessel will be able survive and make money on this trade in the future, however if cargo volumes grow to previous levels then the gamble will have paid off!...interesting times ahead
Chris Howell on May 29, 2013 13:00 (1 year ago)
The media always get the story right !

Ha Ha !
lappino on May 29, 2013 08:26 (1 year ago)
Thanks for the link, Chris!
"...Brobdingnagian hull..." - how aptly named!
However, some parts of the article are just not correct: "...the sections are welded together by dozens of individual welders."
No, they are not.
Koreans would not be where they are now, if they used manual welding of giant hull blocks.
Also, some comments like "The lifeboats (made in China) are small..."
(No, they should be giant, just like the ship!)
Also, while the vessel's top speed in service may indeed be 23 knots, MMM was making close to 26 kn on her trials, if one believes the AIS tracking...
(But the article was still a very interesting read!)
Chris Howell on May 29, 2013 08:04 (1 year ago)
Details

http://gcaptain.com/maersk-triple-e-detailed/
Petros Psarras on May 29, 2013 05:24 (1 year ago)
Which are the exact dimensions of the triple e vessels ??
lappino on May 29, 2013 03:53 (1 year ago)
@ Captain Ted: I used to subscribe to this point of view, that "excess tonnage" of container ships is the main problem of the sector...but now I see things a bit differently. The main idea should be trade volume, and I guess the main players want to be ready when this volume picks up...and it will pick up, eventually.
Malim Sahib on May 28, 2013 22:16 (1 year ago)
A beast which I wouldn't want to sail on. Any kind of incident or onboard issue which extends above 'basic' would be a real challenge to deal with the number of crew available.
Captain Ted on May 28, 2013 21:38 (1 year ago)
HMMM BEAST, all what I see is a huge container ship which makes sure that that section of the market stays in economical problems for some more time to come.
JonWoodhouse on May 28, 2013 21:05 (1 year ago)
Hopefully we will see on of these beasts at Felixstowe
evanbnsf on May 28, 2013 20:17 (1 year ago)
Gosh that is... huge...
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