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Esso Gettysburg - IMO 5107463

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Photo Details
Photographer:William C. Daugherty [View profile]Title:Esso GettysburgAdded:Dec 03, 2007
Captured:IMO:5107463Hits:3,972
Photo Category: Tankers built before 1970
Description:
SS Esso Gettysburg, built in 1957 by Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia. She had three sisters, being, (in no particular order) the Esso Washington, Lexington and Jamestown. Specs: 715' LOA, 93' beam, with a total dispalcement of 50,176 tons. On builders trials she managed 19.75 knots @ a max SHP of 26,500 @ 108.5 rpm. I don't know exactly what they run today, but her block coefficient of .748 was slightly less than a Liberty ships at .75! Still surviving, she is in lay-up at the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet (U.S.) named the "Gettysburg". More information and recent photos are here: http://www.pmars.imsg.com/detail.asp?Ship=1960
also, there is a great webite with info. and photos including many of her construction scanned form a period company magazine at:http://visseraa.piranho.com/International/id222.htm
Vessel Identification
Name:Gettysburg
IMO:5107463
Former name(s):
- Exxon Gettysburg (Until 1987)
- Esso Gettysburg (Until 1973)
Technical Data
Vessel type:Oil Products Tanker
Gross tonnage:23,665 tons
Summer DWT:41,529 tons

Additional Information
Status:Dead
Build year:1957
AIS Information
AIS information: N/A
More Of This Ship
Gettysburg
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Gettysburg
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Photo Comments (5)

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William C. Daugherty on Oct 02, 2013 00:47 (4 years ago)
She has been scrapped, the National Archives "HABS/HAER" program did a documentation of her history & photos of her at the SBRF. The government is at this point "shut down" and I can't get the link to come up, but I'll post it when their website is working properly.

I talked to MARAD about her condition with an eye to saving her for a museum, and her topsides wer in great shape, structurally, though she did evidently need some waterline re-plating. A book about the oil industry's history called "the Prize" won the Pulitzer Prize & was made into a PBS miniseries, as I recall. If that much is possible paper and ink, I think a ship museum, DONE RIGHT, would work too. It could be used to "discuss" the future energy, environmental issues, etc.

Anyway, the Shoshone is still there as are the Mount Washington & Mount Vernon.
dccrane1952 on Nov 12, 2012 22:12 (5 years ago)
The Exxon Gettysburg was my last ship prior to transferring to Exxon International. I was sailing as 1st engineer and took it through shipyard in '81. The only one of this class that I didn't sail on was the Washington.
rossle on Nov 05, 2010 00:48 (7 years ago)
I worked for Exxon briefly in the late 1980's, and worked aboard the Washington (3rd Mate). Exxon laid it up in 12/89 in Port Arthur TX, and I believe it was operated by Coastal thereafter. The Washington had been retrofit with a piping to allow it to load crude over the bow. Exxon had an Oil Rig "Hondo" in the Santa Barbara Channel and the fleet's "Hondo-rigged" ships were used to ferry oil from the rig to the refineries.

At the end, we ran it from Baytown Texas to Baton Rouge, carrying VGO. Steam plant, steam pumps, steam winches! Had a blast on her. Focsle had a cargo hatch, and a hold big enough to play basketball. Was never on a ship like that one ever again.
Carey Akin on Feb 29, 2008 14:54 (10 years ago)
I recall being involved in an emergency high speed turbine rotor repair on a similar tanker down in Galveston around 15 years ago. I could spend a little time and see if it was one of the sisters. I want to say that it was beint operated by Coastal at the time.
William C. Daugherty on May 22, 2007 08:25 (11 years ago)
Does anybody have any details (beyond standard specs) or recollections of this ship, or her sisters (Esso Washington, Lexington and Jamestown)? I read that the main turbines had a weird habit of moving around just slightly?
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